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Late Vehicle Registration Fees

Failure to register a vehicle on time results in a $25-per-month late fee after the 90-day period during which initial registration was required, up to $100 total.  Vehicle owners must pay the taxes and fees to register the vehicle and pro-rated taxes and fees from the date the vehicle should have been registered to the date the owner registered the car.  A supplemental unregistered vehicle fine may be imposed if a person is convicted of misdemeanor, knowingly failing to register a vehicle, within 90 days of becoming a resident of the state.

Vehicle Registration

The requirements for completing vehicle registration can be found here.  Vehicles in Colorado are registered for a 12‑month period, with registration expiring on the last day of the month of the 12‑month registration period.   Certain vehicles (utility trailers, special mobile machinery) qualify for a five‑year registration period.  Vehicles may be registered at intervals of less than one year to allow a multi‑vehicle owner's registrations to expire simultaneously.

Certified VIN Inspections

In some cases, a certified VIN inspection is required.  The inspection conducted by a Peace Officers Standards and Training (P.O.S.T.) certified inspector uses forms provided by the Department of Revenue.  The certified inspector checks both the public VIN (on the dashboard or another highly visible area) and discreet VINs (location provided by the vehicle manufacturer to law enforcement).  The inspector checks both VINs against state and national databases of wanted and stolen vehicles.  The following vehicles require a certified VIN inspection:

Vehicle Identification Number

A vehicle identification number (VIN) verification is a physical inspection to determine whether the VIN on a vehicle matches the VIN on the title.  The verification also entails checking the VIN number on the vehicle against state and national databases of wanted and stolen vehicles.  Vehicle owners new to the state of Colorado, or who recently purchased a vehicle with an out‑of‑state title, must get a VIN verification.  VIN verifications are performed by Colorado law enforcement officers, licensed motor vehicle dealers, and licensed emissions testing stations, such as

Point Suspension

Colorado law permits the point suspension of licenses of drivers who have been convicted of traffic violations and have exceeded a threshold number of points.  Traffic citations received by drivers may result in a certain number of points being recorded against a driver license.  Drivers who exceed the threshold within a certain time period are at risk of having their licenses suspended.

Penalties for Speeding Violations

Under Colorado law, a violation of driving 1 to 24 mph over the posted speed limit is a Class A traffic infraction.  A violation of driving 25 mph or more over the posted limit is a Class 2 misdemeanor traffic offense.  A violation of driving 25 mph or more over the posted limit in a construction zone is a Class 1 misdemeanor traffic offense.  Failure of a driver to reduce vehicle speed to a reasonable and prudent level under hazardous conditions is a Class A traffic infraction.

State Speed Limits

Colorado law establishes speed limits for roads and highways within the state.  The Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) and local authorities may change the speed limit for any road under their respective jurisdictions if the department or local authority determines that the speed limit established by law is greater or less than what is reasonable or safe for road or traffic conditions.  Neither CDOT nor any local authority, however, may increase the speed limit above 75 miles per hour (mph) on any highway.  The table below provides speed limits on Colorado roadways.

Specific Ownership Tax

The specific ownership tax was enacted in 1937 and is contained in Article X, Section 6, of the Colorado Constitution.  The tax is based on the value of the vehicle and is paid each year that a vehicle is registered in Colorado.  It is imposed on cars, trucks, trailers, mobile homes, and special mobile machinery.  Further information on the specific ownership tax is available in Legislative Council Staff's Issue Brief on the Specific Ownership Tax.

Online Accident Report 

The specific ownership tax was enacted in 1937 and is contained in Article X, Section 6, of the Colorado Constitution.  The tax is based on the value of the vehicle and is paid each year that a vehicle is registered in Colorado.  It is imposed on cars, trucks, trailers, mobile homes, and special mobile machinery.  Further information on the specific ownership tax is available in Legislative Council Staff's Issue Brief on the Specific Ownership Tax.

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The effective date for bills enacted without a safety clause is August 7, 2024, if the General Assembly adjourns sine die on May 8, 2024, unless otherwise specified. Details